A global approach to town-gown relations

Modern day tensions between communities and students are not new, but a collaborative initiative that bestrides international borders thinks it can drive fresh progress.

The origins of town-gown relations date back to the middle ages. Perhaps most notably, the Battle of St Scholastica Day on 10 February 1355 at the University of Oxford saw a two-day riot break out as the result of disagreement  between the townsfolk and gownsfolk at a local tavern.

Despite being steeped in history, the concept of ‘town and gown’ is less understood by the wider higher education sector than you might imagine. For reference, then, the ‘town’ is the non-academic population of a locality, and ‘gown’ is the university community.

UKTGA Chair Cooper Healey & Poppy Humphrey getting involved in Community Volunteering

As universities continue to expand, so do the off-campus communities where students reside. There are numerous positives, such as the opportunity for growth of talent and the capability to enhance the local community. Campus community collaborations also provide support for lifelong learning from the ‘classroom of the world’ which sits outside academia.

In reality, despite these opportunities, the meeting of such distinct communities often creates a number of challenges. This requires sensitively handled efforts and dedicated resources to work towards a cohesive environment, in order to offer support to all who live there.

For the full article, click on the link below:

A global approach to town-gown relations


UKTGA & Student Accommodation Conference 2019

The 12th annual Student Accommodation Conference & Awards, organised by Property Week events, returns on Wednesday 11 December 2019 at the InterContinental London – The O2.

The Purpose Built Student Accommodation (PBSA) asset class is maturing and evolving in an operating environment where student well-being, affordability and access to technology are paramount. The right insights and connections will be key to harnessing opportunities and navigating the challenges ahead, making this year’s Student Accommodation Conference a must attend event!

Connect with the most influential figures from the PBSA sector and beyond, including notable operators, investors, developers, universities and higher-education thought leaders.

Our UKTGA Chair, Cooper Healey, has been invited to deliver a session addressing both the possible implications and benefits of the increased number of PBSA being built to accommodate the increasing number of young people deciding to go to University.

For more information, or to book tickets, please click here.


What is Studentification?

The term studentification was coined and defined by Professor Darren Smith as ‘contradictory social, cultural, economic and physical changes resulting from an influx of students within privately- rented accommodation in particular neighbourhoods’. Since then, it has been used in both the media and academic papers across the UK.

Adopting the term studentification has provided a valuable framework for policy makers, universities and other stakeholders across the globe to find more effective ways of integrating students into the physical and social fabric of university towns and cities.

Professor Smith is fascinated by the formation of new social and economic geographies that are giving rise to more exclusive, segregated, and transient societies. The term studentification conceptualises the processes of change within university towns and cities tied to the growth of student populations and the expansion of higher education. To date, Professor Smith has researched studentification in UK, Ireland, North America, Australia and China.

The Studentification Guide for North America has been a pivotal publication in addressing the key issues surrounding the impact of students living in University towns and cities.


Queen's University Belfast is planting one million trees as part of a new Conservation initiative!

Have you heard of the One Million Trees for Belfast Project? 🌳😊

The One Million Trees for Belfast Project is a joint initiative between residents from Sans Souci Park and students from Queen’s University Belfast.

Over the past month, Queen's University Belfast students 👩‍🎓 and staff 👩‍🏫, The Conservation Volunteers Northern Ireland and volunteers from Sans Souci Residents' Association collected acorns and seeds🌾🌿, raised garden beds 🌷 and made paths in Lennoxvale Tree Nursery, just off the Malone road. The tree nursery will provide local wildlife 🐝🐜 with a home and will produce 1,000 trees 🌱🌳 over the next 2 years that will be donated towards the One Million Trees for Belfast Project! 😎
We look forward to many more opportunities for closer working with our neighbours.
Today we are officially launching the tree nursery so watch this space for updates on the progress! 📈

Check out this video to get a little insight into what this project is all about!

https://www.facebook.com/QUBSUVolunteering/videos/472469716705957/